Talents & Frustrations

Today is my dear husband’s 75th birthday. Quite a milestone! We celebrated officially last Sunday night after a church function, and are looking forward to a dinner out with the family tomorrow. Of course he blogs about it on his site, mentioning all the things that have changed since he was a boy.

What really scares me is the thought that the next twenty years will go by just as fast as the last twenty. Whatever happened to “old age, when the hours would drag by”? We find the flight of time incredible!

I can assure you that in his youth Bob was a studious lad just like the young fellow below. I don’t know if there was ever a “Willy Brown” in his school to be jealous of, though. Hope this poem gives you a smile.

FRUSTRATION

My teacher says that I’m the best
And smartest boy in school;
I’m never careless like the rest;
I never break a rule.
If visitors should come to call,
She has me speak a piece,
Or tell what makes an apple fall
Or binds the coast of Greece.
You might expect that since my brain
Holds such an awful lot,
I’d be extremely proud and vain;
But, oh–I’m not.
For Willy Brown’s a cleverer lad
Than I could hope to be;
Why, I’d give anything I had
To be as smart as he!
He can’t recite, “Hark, Hark, the Lark,”
He’s not the teacher’s pet;
He never gets a perfect mark
In ‘rithmetic — and yet,
Could I be he, I’d waste no tears
On foolish things like sums;
For Willy Brown can wag his ears
And dislocate his thumbs.

Author’s name unknown to me.

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Wild Flower….

Are you in the mood for something whimsical today? I came across this poem several days ago and thought you readers might enjoy it as much as I did.
Thanks M-R for allowing me to Reblog your lovely poem.

Montana Rose Photography

dsc_4113I often wonder what it’s like
To be a little wild flower
Lost amongst the others
Out in a big ole field
Bending in the wind
Basking in the sun
Soaking up the rain
It’s the same old story
A little bit cliché really
Still…it doesn’t stop me
From wishing it was so
To be a little wild flower
Dancing in a field of snow

Or maybe something like that. I don’t know really.  Just words rumbling around in my head.  This picture was taken on my trip last year.  I stopped a little place in Wisconsin. No idea what it was called. I remember being disappointed with the actual destination in that area, but I got a few good shots.

This obviously isn’t the original picture. I mean, in a sense.  I played around with it. I like it better this way. I hope that you do too.

Have…

View original post 8 more words

Storms And More Storms

Winter “Clipper” Roars Through

Yesterday morning our weather had warmed up here in Sask — temp got up to -9̊ C. Which brought in a fast-moving storm by evening with howling wind gusts that rattled our windows something fierce. I was afraid the power might go out, so I placed candles and flashlights in strategic places, just in case. Thankfully we haven’t had a lot of snow to blow, and not a lot came down during the “clipper”, or it would have been much worse for drivers.

This morning dawned clear and sunny, but the temp has dropped to -31̊ C, below -40 with wind-chill factored in. I call that “bitterly cold”! So I’m happy to stay inside all day, thankful I don’t have to pump gas or do any other out-in-all-weathers job.

Today’s Word Press prompt is someday. Very fitting.

Someday it will be spring. The grass will green up, the trees will bud and blossom, perennials will poke through. Someday. Meanwhile, today I plan to edit this book I’ve been working on, for teen boys.

I also posted Winter’s Day Dreams on Tree Top Haiku.

Book report: Hurricane
© 2003, 2008 by Terry Trueman
HarperCollins Publishers

Speaking of a book for teen boys, I read one yesterday that I thought was terrific. In the book Hurricane, by Terry Trueman, Jose, a young teen from a small Honduras village, stays at home with his mother and younger siblings in their small village while his dad, older brother and sister, have gone to the city. The day starts out rainy, nothing too unusual. Unknown to them, this is the forefront of Hurricane Mitch, the storm that devastated Central America in 1998.

They initially have to contend with the worsening storm, trying to keep their belongings dry under the leaking roof, and wondering about their missing family members. I small battery radio tells them about the damage Mitch is doing all over their country.  Then before the night is over Jose hears a great rumbling sound and mud from the loggers’ clean-cut patch on the mountain above comes pouring down on them, burying most of the village in sludge.

The author has done a great job of depicting the feelings of a boy caught up in a tragedy. We understand his amazement facing a sea of mud, overwhelmed by the cries of survivors needing help. We see his efforts together with neighbors digging in the mud for their loved ones and for food. We feel his revulsion at finding dead bodies — and sympathize with his constant fear that his father and siblings have been swept away, buried in other mud somewhere. Will they ever be found? Sandwiched in between are his flashbacks to the good times and questions about the future.

The author does all this in a refreshingly “clean” story with very little profanity and no immorality. Jose’s family, God-fearing Catholic people who believe in prayer, are trying to apply faith and trust in the midst of tragedy. This is a book I’d give to any reader, teen or adult.

Plugging the Infinite Loopholes

Today’s WordPress Daily prompt: infinite. I thought this quote might fit the bill.

Ever wonder why legal contracts are pages long? I was just reading a book by Canadian humourist Stephen Leacock, who offers this tongue-in-cheek explanation:

Legal sentences must of necessity be long. A lawyer dare not stop. If he ever seems to have brought a thing to a complete end then somebody may discover something left unsaid and invalidate everything.

The Tenth Commandment is able to say “Thou shalt not steal.” A lawyer has to say, “Subject always to the provision of clauses 8-20 below thou shalt not steal, except as hereinafter provided.”

Even at that the lawyer would have to take another look at the word steal and scratch it out in favour of, “thou shalt not steal, pilfer, rob, appropriate, hook, swipe, or in any other way obtain unlawful possession of anything.”

Then the word thing would start him off again to write: “thing, object, commodity, chattel, property….”

Excerpt from the book HOW TO WRITE by Stephen Leacock
Published 1944 by JOHN LANE THE BODLEY HEAD LTD
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

This reminds me of a news item I read one day:

Corporate lawyers must have a tough job fine-tuning lawsuit-proof explanations, especially in the US.

One day an American bought himself a brand new motor home, but crashed it while travelling down the highway. He explained later that he’d left the motor home to drive itself while he went to the back to get himself a cup of coffee. He sued the manufacturer for (I forget how many) million dollars in damages because the instruction manual didn’t specify that you can’t leave the steering wheel unattended while the vehicle is in motion.

Won his case, too. Good lawyer?

The Case of the Talented Writer

Meet  Author Alison Golden

Her Amazon Author Page Link here
Her website: Cosy Mysteries.com

If you are one to enjoy a good cozy mystery now and then I’ll tell you about a series I’ve been reading and enjoying. I just finished the latest: The Case of the Broken Doll, an Inspector David Graham Cozy Mystery.

Detective Inspector David Graham has left the big city behind and chosen a quieter life on the Isle of Jersey, where crime is supposedly minimal. But quiet it hasn’t been since he arrived. First he had a couple of murder cases to solve and now a disappearance.

But this case is a cold one: fifteen-year-old Beth disappeared from a street in the village of Gorey street ten years ago, leaving behind only the leg broken off the doll she was carrying. And one of his two constables, Jim Roach, was a classmate of Beth’s. There were no witnesses at all; a search of the whole island yielded no trace of her.

Folks are remembering her on the tenth anniversary of her disappearance, so of course D I Graham hears the story. Some folks — and especially his constable, Jim Roach — encourage him to look into this unsolved mystery, so he starts making inquiries. His first visit is with Beth’s mother, now widowed. Ann Ridley has made a shrine of Beth’s room and is operating the Beth Ridley Foundation, accepting donations to fund the ongoing search for her daughter. After ten years, is it all in vain?

I really enjoyed this well plotted, well executed police procedural. I’m happy to see the author further developing her cast of characters and I especially enjoyed seeing them as a team working together to solve this case. Captain Janet goes online; DI Graham and Constable Jim interview teachers and people who saw Beth Ridley that morning, trying to get some lead as to how she could simply vanish. Then a random glance turns into their best clue.

I saw a few spots that could have used a bit of editorial polish, but over all it’s well written, as is all her stories. I’m eager to read the next one.

This novel is considered a stand-alone, but the series order is:
#1 The Case of the Screaming Beauty (Prequel)
#2 The Case of the Hidden Flame
#3 The Case of the Fallen Hero
#4 The Case of the Broken Doll
#5 The Case of the Missing Letter — to be released soon

This writer also write a cozy series involving the Reverend Annabelle Dixon, an Anglican priest in a small English village.
I understand her third series is more suspenseful and the main character is Diana Hunter.

God Rest Ye Merry, Gentle People

Here’s wishing each one of you a happy Christmas season, good times with family, and above all, peace in your hearts.

nativity-447767_640
“Once in royal David’s city
stood a lowly cattle shed
where a mother laid her baby
in a manger for his bed.
Mary was that mother mild,
Jesus Christ her little child.”

Cecil F Alexander

Never in history has one birth, or one Person,
so inspired the world of art and music ever after.